APA and the Code Council Publish an Updated International Residential Code Lateral Bracing Guide

AAA ICC For Immediate Release August 15, 2018 www.iccsafe.org Contact: Whitney Doll (202) 568-1798 wdoll@iccsafe.org Tara Mattina, APA (253) 620-7413 tara.mattina@apawood.org APA and the Code Council publish an updated International Residential Code lateral bracing guide New edition of the book aims to improve understanding and application of the...

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ICC News Release
For Immediate Release
August 15, 2018
www.iccsafe.org
Contact: Whitney Doll
(202) 568-1798
wdoll@iccsafe.org

Tara Mattina, APA
(253) 620-7413
tara.mattina@apawood.org

APA and the Code Council publish an updated International Residential Code lateral bracing guide
New edition of the book aims to improve understanding and application of the 2018 IRC lateral bracing requirements

Washington, D.C. – A new illustrated book, co-published by the International Code Council and APA – The Engineered Wood Association, provides an explanation of the lateral bracing provisions of the 2018 International Residential Code (IRC). A Guide to the 2018 IRC Wood Wall Bracing Provisions, the fifth edition in the series, details the correct application of the code-bracing requirements, explores the history and theory behind wall bracing, and provides real-world bracing examples. The book is now available in print and digital formats.

“Residential wall bracing under the IRC is one of the most critical, yet most misunderstood, building safety elements,” said Code Council Executive Vice President and Director of Business Development Mark A. Johnson. “The 2018 guide is updated with new practical examples to serve as an important and helpful resource for inspectors, plan checkers, builders, designers and others involved in residential construction. The ongoing collaboration between APA and the Code Council benefits public safety and the industry. We are pleased to build on a long-standing relationship with APA.”

The IRC contains numerous prescriptive lateral bracing provisions intended to help residential structures resist lateral loads that can result from wind and seismic events. The type and amount of bracing required for a given structure depend on many factors, including location and size of the structure, and the location of bracing segments within the structure. Bracing must be applied correctly and consistently to sufficiently protect the building from lateral loads, according to the Code Council and APA.

“Most of the residential buildings in the U.S. are built to the IRC. Wall bracing is what makes those buildings perform well against lateral wind and seismic loads,” said Dr. Borjen Yeh, P.E., director of APA’s Technical Services. “These provisions are complex and prescriptive, given the great number of aesthetic, cultural, economic and energy-related variables. This guide makes these provisions easy to understand.”

The guide addresses bracing options available to builders and designers, the amount of bracing required with adjustments and variations, rules for the use of bracing, the new simplified wall bracing provisions, whole house bracing considerations and many other related topics. The full-color book features numerous specific examples and more than 200 figures, tables and photos.

A Guide to the 2018 IRC Wood Wall Bracing Provisions is available for purchase in printed soft cover for $44.00 ($35.25 for ICC members) or digital PDF format for $41.95 ($33.50 for ICC members). Click here for more information.

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About the International Code Council

The International Code Council is a member-focused association. It is dedicated to developing model codes and standards used in the design, build and compliance process to construct safe, sustainable, affordable and resilient structures. Most U.S. communities and many global markets choose the International Codes.

About APA – The Engineered Wood Association

Founded in 1933 and based in Tacoma, Washington, APA represents approximately 172 plywood, oriented strand board, glulam timber, wood I-joist, Rim Board and structural composite lumber mills throughout North America. Its primary functions are quality auditing and testing, applied research, and market support and development.

Source: www.iccsafe.org